Sunday, June 4, 2017

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Monday, April 17, 2017

'The Writers of Wrongs' blog



If you are a reader of crime history, you are certain to find interesting items on The Writers of Wrongs blog

Launched in the fall of 2016, the blog now has four steady contributors, with more on the way. Sixty-four posts have been written to date by these true crime authors:

- Christian Cipollini, author of Lucky Luciano: Mysterious Tales of a Gangland Legend; Murder Inc.: Mysteries of the Mob's Most Deadly Hit Squad; Diary of a Motor City Hit Man.

- Ellen Poulsen, author of  Don't Call Us Molls: Women of the John Dillinger Gang; The Case Against Lucky Luciano: New York's Most Sensational Vice Trial.

- Patrick Downey, author of On the Spot: Gangland Murders in Prohibition New York City; Hollywood on the Spot: Crimes Against the Early Movie Stars; Legs Diamond: Gangster; Bad Seeds in the Big Apple; Gangster City.

- Thomas Hunt, author of Wrongly Executed?; coauthor of Deep Water, DiCarlo: Buffalo's First Family of Crime; contributor to Mafia: The Necessary Reference to Organized Crime; editor of Informer.

Visit the blog at www.writersofwrongs.com

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Closing of Scribd document store

We were advised on February 1, 2017, that the Scribd document store would soon be closing. Today is its official closing day. The business change appears linked to Scribd's repackaging as an e-book subscription service.

Informer issues and articles had been available for purchase through the Scribd store since the fall of 2010. Thousands of readers used the Scribd store to access Informer documents. We regret access will no longer be possible through Scribd, but this is entirely out of our control.

Fortunately, Informer electronic and print editions remain available for preview and purchase through the MagCloud/Blurb service. All Informer issues - from the very first issue back in September 2008 - can still be acquired through MagCloud/Blurb. MagCloud/Blurb is our "go-to" service for Informer distribution, but we will be checking into other document sale and distribution options.

Click to visit Informer on the MagCloud/Blurb service.


Wednesday, February 22, 2017

June 2017 issue of Informer

We have just penciled in a summer 2017 issue of Informer. 

The articles deadline is April 28. The advertising deadline is May 26. If you would like to contribute an article or purchase an ad, contact us at informerjournal@gmail.com

Thursday, September 22, 2016

October 2016 issue of Informer

October 2016 Issue Contents
Editorial


A highly regarded sculptor of granite was shot to death at a 1903 meeting of socialists in Vermont. Elia Corti joined a growing list of martyrs to the radical leftist cause of anarchism, championed by Vermont-based newspaper editor Luigi Galleani.

A short time after the death of Corti, followers of Galleani engaged in a war of terror against leading figures of capitalism and the government of the United States. The little-remembered fight involved government abuses of individual rights, wholesale deportations of foreigners deemed to be threats and a series of anarchist bombings that climaxed with a deadly explosion on Wall Street.

In this issue, Thomas Hunt looks at the Corti killing (Link) and the anarchists’ conflict with the U.S. (Link).

Also in this issue:

  •   Historian/genealogist Justin Cascio explores 100 years of family links among the leaders of the Corleone, Sicily, Mafia and its U.S. Mafia offshoots. (Link).
  •   Book review and notes (Link).
  •   In ‘The Warner Files,’ Richard N. Warner discusses the entertaining but flawed history told by Herbert Asbury (Link).
  •   100 Years Ago (Link).
  •   In ‘Just One More Thing,’ Thomas Hunt tries to track down elusive Providence, Rhode Island, boss Frank ‘Butsey” Morelli (Link).

48 pages including covers and nine pages of advertisements.

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.


Leftist radicals clash in Barre, Vermont

October 2016 contents
Features.

Leftist radicals clash in Barre, Vermont
Sculptor Elia Corti is slain as
U.S. vs anarchy war begins
by Thomas Hunt

"What was billed as a political discussion became a bloody melee. Several gunshots were fired and a man fell mortally wounded. At least one man was stabbed. Another was thrown down stone stairs into the street. By the time police arrived, the shooting victim was near death, and the cause of American anarchism was about to gain a new martyr."

Ten pages including one and a half pages of notes, nine images.

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

'Family business' - the Corleone Fratuzzi

October 2016 contents
Features.

'Family business' - the Corleone Fratuzzi
by Justin Cascio

"Nearly all the leaders of the Corleone Mafia for the past hundred years have been related to one another through blood and marriage. The Sicilian Mafia we know today was once many Mafias. Each town, suburb and district of the Province of Palermo, the heartland of the Sicilian mafia, had a local gang and a different leader..."

Twelve and a half pages, one family tree

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

Warner Files: Asbury's flawed history

October 2016 contents.
Columns.

The Warner Files: 

History must be more than
the repetition of legend
by Richard N. Warner

"Lately I've been revisiting The Gangs of New York. Not the film, although the Martin Scorsese-directed film was enjoyable. My favorite character was Daniel Day-Lewis's 'Bill the Butcher' Cutting, the stove-pipe hat wearing nativist bully, and my favorite scene was the preamble to the fight between Cutting's Natives against the Dead Rabbits. Liam Neeson as the priest Vallon stands holding a cross and one gang after another lines up on his side. 'The O'Connell Guard!' 'The Shirt Tails!' 'The Chichesters!' 'The Forty Thieves!' Entertaining, yes. Accurate history, not so much..."

One and a half pages.

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

The Galleanists' war of terror

October 2016 contents.
Features.

The Galleanists' war of terror
by Thomas Hunt

"The roots of the anarchist political philosophy in Europe extend back to the French Revolution and may be detected in many of the countries of Europe. Living conditions of the working classes through the Industrial Revolution aided the spread of the anti-authority philosophy. Some of its early proponents in Italy were Carlo Cafiero, Errico Malatesta and Giuseppe Fanelli.
Though socialists-communists and anarchists sought similar revolutionary objectives, they differed substantially on approach and regularly came into conflict..."

Five and a half pages including one page of notes, two images.

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

Books

October 2016 Contents
Books

Books

  •   'Wiser Guy' recalls the wiseguys.
  •   Expected next year
  •   Dark History and Horror Convention.
  •   Prosecutor writes about 'Crooked Brooklyn.'

100 Years Ago: 1916

October 2016 issue contents
Columns

100 Years Ago: 1916

"January 12—One Dallas patrolman is killed and another is seriously wounded in a gunfight with Italian gangsters. Police are searching for saloon-keeper Frank Bonano, believed to be one of the gangsters..."

One half page, one image

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

Just One More Thing: 'Butsey' Morelli

October 2016 issue contents
columns

Just One More Thing

On the trail of 'Butsey' Morelli
by Thomas Hunt

"Those seeking information on long-time Providence, Rhode Island, rackets boss Frank 'Butsey' Morelli have likely encountered the few short mentions in former mobster Vincent Teresa's autobiography and very little else. Morelli was an important figure in the development of the New England Mafia, and he was an especially long-tenured chieftain over the Providence underworld, but he was not a cooperative historical figure."

Three pages, two images

Preview / purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.

Sunday, May 22, 2016

September issue of Informer

The next issue of Informer: The History of American Crime and Law Enforcement is tentatively scheduled for September 23, 2016. 

PUBLICATION DATE: SEPTEMBER 23

Editorial material - Articles, letters, reviews, columns, announcements, etc. can be submitted to informerjournal@gmail.com through July 22, 2016. (Earlier is better.)

ARTICLES DEADLINE: JULY 22

Advertising material - The advertising deadline for that issue is August 26, 2016. Communication relating to advertising also should be sent through informerjournal@gmail.com. General ad rates remain $100 for a full page, $64 for a half page and $40 for a quarter page. Informer continues to offer a half-price discount for authors of true crime books and publishers of true crime websites. See: "Half-price ads" for details.

AD DEADLINE: AUGUST 26

Friday, October 16, 2015

October 2015 Issue of Informer

October 2015 Issue Contents
Editorial


Smothered by law enforcement surveillance and infiltration in their home territory and wary of reprisals by deposed boss Stefano Magaddino, a rebel group of Buffalo, New York, Mafiosi in 1969 explored racket opportunities in what they thought were greener pastures in Florida. 
The move quickly caught the attention of the FBI. Rather than provide security for the breakaway organized crime faction, the lost time and resources in Florida led to the collapse of the Pieri-DiCarlo regime in the Buffalo underworld. In this issue, Thomas Hunt and Michael A. Tona tell the story of Buffalo’s attempts to establish a rackets colony in Florida (Preview).

Plenty has been written over the years about Lucky Luciano. Some accounts have been factual, some fictional, at least one fictional pretending to be factual. In C. Joseph Greaves’ latest novel, we find a fictional account built on a foundation of historical research. Greaves tells readers about his book, his approach and the cache of previously overlooked documents that provided him a fresh window into the subject (Preview).

What is the oldest U.S. federal law enforcement agency? The little known postal inspection service, formed under Benjamin Franklin in the Colonial Era, has a claim to that designation. Author and retired postal inspector H.K. Petschel provides a brief history of “the Silent Service” (Preview).

Also in this issue:
  • The U.S. Postal Service delivery of the Hope Diamond.
  • Patrick Downey runs through the underworld’s greatest “hits” of the month of October (Preview).
  • Richard N. Warner reviews two recently released books, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel and The Two Mafias (Preview).

Fifty-four pages, including covers and eight pages of advertisements.

Preview/purchase electronic and print editions through MagCloud.