Monday, October 22, 2018

November 2018 issue of Informer

November 2018 issue contents
Editorial

http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/1510369


Adhesive tape was a fairly recent invention when robbers began finding it especially handy in their field of endeavor. It was quicker and easier to bind and gag a victim with strips of the sticky material than with cloth or rope. And a roll of tape was far easier to carry around. Due to the novelty of this approach, newspapers dubbed groups that used it, “tape bandits.”

We learn in this issue’s feature by Jeffery S. King (Preview), that notorious gangster George “Baby Face” Nelson once led a group of these enterprising tape bandits.


Also in this issue:

  • Saving a person from the electric chair may not always be the same as saving the person’s “life.” Thomas Hunt’s article (Preview) reveals that one wrongly convicted man was emotionally destroyed despite Detective Joseph Petrosino’s heroic efforts to free him from Sing Sing’s Death House.
  • Did Albany’s powerful O’Connell Machine ensure the 1930s conviction and electrocution of widow Anna Antonio merely to shield local bootlegging and narcotics rackets? Ellen Poulsen considers the question (Preview).
  • Author Christian Cipollini reveals past, present and what might happen if he ever smiled for a photograph (Preview).
  • Richard N. Warner explores the unsolved murder of Chicago’s Sam Giancana (Preview).
  • Thomas Hunt ponders “Wherefore art thou, [Frank] Romeo?” (Preview).
  • Book reviews and announcements (Preview).

Sixty-eight pages.

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Nelson and the Tape Bandits

November 2018 issue contents
Features

Baby Face Nelson
and the Tape Bandits

By Jeffery S. King

In 1930, George “Baby Face” Nelson committed major crimes for the first time with the so-called “Tape Bandits.” The group earned its name by temporarily ensuring the silence of its victims through the use of adhesive tape.
Although the gang had several members, we only know about Nelson, Stanton John Randall (real name John Francis Haggerty) and Harry Lewis Powell (real name Harry Lewis Pinsky)...

Eight pages including twelve images and a half page of notes.

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'Keep him away!'

November 2018 issue contents
Features

'Keep him away!'

'He's coming to take me to the CHAIR!'
 
By Thomas Hunt

Carbone
One of the more celebrated murder investigations of legendary New York Police Department Detective Joseph Petrosino involved his effort to save the life of a man condemned to die in the electric chair. While Petrosino succeeded in correcting a miscarriage of justice and establishing the innocence of the convicted murderer by locating and arresting the actual guilty party, whether he can be said to have saved a “life” depends largely on one’s point of view...

Eleven pages including twelve images and a page and a half of notes.

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Dope and duplicity in 1930s Albany

November 2018 issue contents
Features

Dope and duplicity in 1930s Albany

By Ellen Poulsen

Anna Antonio
Struggling against the pain and weakness that resulted from his many wounds, he pulled himself to the top of the roadside ravine and onto the dark two-way highway between Albany and Hudson, New York. The bloody and prostrate hitchhiker, appearing to be the victim of a gangland hit, was observed and picked up by some on-the-road college students, who took him to Albany’s Memorial Hospital...

Eight pages including eleven images and a half page of notes.

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Interview: Christian Cipollini

November 2018 issue contents
Interview

Interview: Christian Cipollini

"My interest was sparked by my father’s interest in history, especially the lesser known corners of it. On the surface one would think my mob fascination was an obvious influence because my dad was a narcotics cop, but oddly enough, not overtly. His job lit a spark that didn’t fully flame until years later, leading me toward fact-finding as a whole, and instilling in me that history is always relevant: We’re never given all the clues at once, there’s always more to piece together, and somehow all of it does indeed repeat itself, for better or worse, if we don’t pay attention to it."

Six pages including three images.

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Book reviews, announcements

November 2018 issue contents
Books

Reviews for Behind the Murder Curtain by Bruce Sackman, Michael Vecchione and Jerry Schmetterer: Ghost: My Thirty Years as an FBI Undercover Agent by Michael R. McGowan and Ralph Pezzullo.

Announcements for Inspector Oldfield and the Black Hand Society, Carmine the Snake, Chasing Dillinger.

Five pages including five images.

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Who killed Sam? A mystery solved?

November 2018 issue contents
Columns

Warner Files: 

Who killed Sam? A mystery solved?

By Richard N. Warner


Giancana
Earlier this year, on June 27, 2018, Frank Calabrese Jr., son of the late Outfit hitman Frank "the Breeze" Calabrese Sr., gave an interview on WGN-TV in Chicago in which he threw out a potential bombshell revelation into the biggest mystery in the history of the Chicago Outfit: "Who Killed Sam Giancana?"

His answer made a lot of mob-watchers rethink what they thought they knew.

Four pages including five images.

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Wherefore art thou, Romeo?

November 2018 issue contents
Columns

Just One More Thing:

Wherefore art thou, Romeo?

By Thomas Hunt

His deeds forgotten and his remains misplaced, Frank Romeo is a mysterious figure in New Orleans underworld history.

Recalled by history merely as one of eleven men murdered in an 1891 lynch mob assault on Orleans Parish Prison, Romeo, also known as Romero, actually served a key, longtime role in the evolution of organized crime in southern Louisiana.

Eleven and a half pages including eight images and two and a half pages of notes.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2018

November 2018 issue preview

Here's a look at the cover of the next Informer issue (available late October 2018).



Contents:
  • Baby Face Nelson and the 'Tape Bandits' by Jeffery S. King. 
  • Dope and duplicity in 1930s Albany (conviction and execution of Anna Antonio) by Ellen Poulsen. 
  • 'He's coming to take me to the chair' (Petrosino frees convicted killer) by Thomas Hunt. 
  • Interview: Christian Cipollini. 
  • Book Reviews: Behind the Murder Curtain, Ghost: My Thirty Years as an FBI Undercover Agent. 
  • Book Notes: Inspector Oldfield and the Black Hand Society, Carmine the Snake, Chasing Dillinger. 
  • Warner Files: Who killed Sam Giancana? by Richard N. Warner. 
  • Just One More Thing: Wherefore art thou, Romeo? (New Orleans lynch victim Frank Romeo) by Thomas Hunt.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Next issue: November 2018

The next issue of Informer: The History of American Crime and Law Enforcement is scheduled for release in the fall of 2018.

Writers:
Final deadline for article submission is August 17. If you would like to have an article considered for publication in this issue, please contact informerjournal@gmail.com as soon as possible.

Advertisers:
Contact informerjournal@gmail.com to place an order for a display advertisement in this issue.

Early ad deadline is July 20, 2018. Discount of 1/3 off the standard price will be awarded if print-ready advertisement is received and paid for by this early deadline. Discounted pricing: Full page $78; Half page $40; Quarter page $24.

Final ad deadline is September 28, 2018. Print-ready advertisement must be received and paid for by this date in order to appear in the issue. Standard pricing: Full page $117; Half page $60; Quarter page $36.

Ad dimensions (300 dpi resolution required):

  • Full page 7.75 ins wide and 10.25 ins tall.
  • Full page full-bleed 8.25 ins wide and 10.75 ins tall with no text within 0.25 in (75 pixels) of the edge.
  • Half page 7.75 ins wide and 5 ins tall. 
  • Quarter page 3.75 ins wide and 5 ins tall. 

Readers:
Scheduled issue release date is November 9, 2018. The issue will be available in print and electronic editions through the online MagCloud service.

Monday, June 26, 2017

August 2017 issue of Informer

August 2017 contents
Editorial


This issue's "cover story" is an excerpt from Dock Boss, scheduled for release this summer by Barricade Books. Dock Boss, the story of Eddie McGrath and the mobsters who controlled New York City's West Side waterfront, is the first book-length project by crime historian Neil G. Clarke (Preview).

Also in this issue:
  •  Lennert Van`t Riet and David Critchley provide a groundbreaking history of Frank Zito's little-known but influential Springfield, Illinois, Mafia organization (Preview).
  •  Justin Cascio explores the career and family connections of the "Capitano," Angelo Di Carlo, who held key underworld positions on both sides of the Atlantic (Preview).
  •  Edmond Valin digs through government records to discover the identity of a Bonanno Family informant (Preview).
  •  Bill Feather provides details on the founding of twenty-nine United States Mafia organizations (Preview).
  •  Richard Warner reviews books on an axe-wielding killer, the origins of street gangs and revered New York law enforcement officer Joseph Petrosino (Preview).
  •  In The Warner Files, Richard Warner outlines recent changes in the Chicago Outfit (Preview).
[REMINDER: The Scribd online document-sharing service recently made the business decision to shut down the Scribd Store, one of Informer's electronic edition distribution channels since fall of 2010. At this time, the MagCloud/Blurb service is the sole distributor of Informer print and electronic editions.]

104 Pages

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West Side waterfront warfare

August 2017 contents
Features

West Side
Waterfront
Warfare

Reputations are made

By Neil G. Clark

"Police were hot on the waterfront gangsters' trails following the four months of shootings that had shaken the West Side underworld. The attention of the NYPD turned to the Joe Butler associates in New York City, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation took up the hunt for the members of the Charlie Yanowsky group in New Jersey... "

Six and a half pages, seven images, source listing.

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Frank Zito and the Springfield Mafia

August 2017 contents
Features

Frank Zito

and the little-known
Mafia of Springfield

By Lennert Van`t Riet and David Critchley

"Little attention has been paid to the smaller Mafia families of the United States. Collectively, these overlooked organizations helped to give Cosa Nostra its national range and eventually justified the use of U.S. federal law enforcement power to combat organized crime. The crime family of Springfield, Illinois, is one such entity. Its criminal enterprises were typical of Mafia families, springing from prohibitions against such 'victimless' crimes as bootlegging and gambling and including episodes of violence..."

Thirty-nine pages, nineteen images, endnotes.

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Mafia Genealogy: 'Capitano' Di Carlo

August 2017 contents
Features

Mafia Genealogy:

'Capitano' DiCarlo: 
Architect of Leggio's Mafia

By Justin Cascio

"Regarded as an architect of the Sicilian Mafia after World War II, Angelo Di Carlo was born in Corleone, Province of Palermo, Sicily. In his youth, he served in an artillery unit during Italy's colonial war in Libya. There he earned the military rank that became his nickname, 'Capitano.'"

Thirteen pages, two images, endnotes.

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William Dara, informant for Feds

August 2017 contents
Features

Indentifying Underworld Informants:

Bonanno member
in South Florida
aided federal agents

By Edmond Valin

"The Federal Bureau of Investigation has relied on member-informants to help investigate U.S. Mafia organizations ever since Joseph Valachi began to 'talk.' Mobsters who secretly turn against 'La Cosa Nostra' are in a position to give the FBI access to the history and activities of crime groups that is hard to equal. Some like Valachi testify in court and become household names, but most remain unknown to the public and to the organization itself..."

Ten pages, four images, endnotes.

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Origins of U.S. Mafia families

August 2017 contents
Features 

Origins of U.S. Mafia families

By Bill Feather

"In his book The Last Testament of Bill Bonanno: The Final Secrets of a Life in the Mafia, Bill Bonanno revealed that there had been a Cosa Nostra family in Birmingham. This was a shock to many researchers. Bonanno stated that in the mid-1930s the family asked the Mafia Commission for permission to disband. The reason given was that surviving members were too old..."

Fourteen pages, one map, notes.

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