Saturday, January 29, 2011

January 2011 issue of Informer

January 2011 Contents

Recently reorganized under the Commission system favored by Charlie "Lucky" Luciano, in 1932 the American Mafia reacted quickly to a bloody revival of old underworld rivalries. Luciano's underboss Vito Genovese called together an underworld convention in Brooklyn and ordered Pittsburgh Mafia boss John Bazzano to appear and answer for the recent murders of the Neapolitan Volpe Brothers.
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The notorious Brady Gang traveled to Bangor Maine in autumn of 1937. The FBI was waiting. Richard Shaw tells the tale of the Brady Gang's last days. (preview)

Much of what we believe we know about the Mafia's "Joe the Boss" Masseria turns out to be untrue. In his first column for Informer, underworld researcher Richard Warner sets the record straight. (preview)

Interviewed by Ellen Poulsen, true crime author William Helmer reflects on Dillinger, Nelson, Capone and a career at Playboy. (preview)

Bill Feather provides a membership chart for the Genovese Crime Family based in New York. (preview)

On October 27, 2010, the Mattix family of Iowa lost a beloved patriarch, the community of true crime writers lost a treasured friend and the Informer journal lost its editorial director. Rick Mattix's death was keenly felt by both of his families - the one related to him by blood and marriage and the other tied to him by professional appreciation and admiration. While we gave some consideration to closing Informer following the tragic news, it seemed a far better choice to use the journal as a means for his second family to assist his first family. (preview)

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1932 Murder of John Bazzano

January 2011 Contents
Feature Article
By Thomas Hunt and Michael A. Tona

Recently reorganized under the Commission system,
in 1932 the American Mafia reacted quickly to a
bloody revival of old underworld rivalries

A Test of Resolve

By Thomas Hunt
and Michael A. Tona

   "As a member of the Mafia criminal network in the United States and a veteran of Prohibition Era gang wars, Pittsburgh underworld boss John Bazzano surely knew he was in jeopardy when he received a summons from higher-ups in mid-summer of 1932.
   "Vito Genovese wanted to see him in New York City. Second in command of Charlie 'Lucky' Luciano’s massive underworld empire, Genovese was one of the elite criminal leaders in the country, certainly the most powerful Neapolitan gangster.
   "An order to appear before a more senior gang boss did not come with an explanation. It did not need one. Mafiosi understood that attendance was mandatory. Though the call to such a meeting often preceded the harshest form of underworld discipline, refusal of the summons surely meant death."

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Thirty-nine and a half pages including eight pages of notes, thirty-eight images and three maps.

Last Days of the Brady Gang

January 2011 Contents
Feature Article
By Richard Shaw

The Last Days of the Brady Gang

By Richard Shaw

"Poppy Davis may wish she'd never gone to work that autumn morning sixty years ago. She could have relaxed at home, while others in downtown Bangor, Maine, experienced the terrifying rattle of gunfire. But there she was, standing in the window of the Paramount Cafe with a ringside seat to history. The date was Tuesday, October12, 1937."

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Twelve pages including six images.

The Warner Files: Giuseppe Masseria

January 2011 Contents
Column: Warner Files
By Richard N. Warner

On the Trail of Giuseppe
"Joe the Boss" Masseria

By Richard N. Warner

In his first Informer column, Richard N. Warner dispels myths related to Joe the Boss Masseria and establishes at last the Sicilian birthplace of the infamous crime boss.

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Three pages including a document excerpt.

Interview: William Helmer

January 2011 Contents
Interview
By Ellen Poulsen

Gangster-Era Historian
William J. Helmer

By Ellen Poulsen

"...The original account [of the St. Valentine's Day Massacre] has been virtually carved in stone and perpetuated by every writer and filmmaker since... The idea of the trap being laid by a shipment of Old Log Cabin was an elaboration on one talkative Prohibition official’s goofy hijack theory...The idiot Prohibition official got a bunch of these ideas into headlines that day and the next before he was transferred out of Chicago for implicating even the police, and then lost his job. But his speculations have gone down as history."

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Eight and a half pages including one image.

Genovese Mafia Chart

January 2011 Contents
Membership Charts
By Bill Feather


The January issue includes a 1930s-1970s Genovese Crime Family membership chart by Bill Feather. The Seven and a half-page chart includes more than 150 documented and suspected Mafiosi along with birth, death, immigration, relationship, rank and other information.

Seven and a half pages.

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Tribute to Rick Mattix

January 2011 Contents
Tribute

"I suppose it seems odd to some that the serious study of history's criminals draws in many fine people. But I have found it to be true. Rick Mattix, the dean of crime researchers, was among the very best."

"On October 27, 2010, the true crime community lost one of its greatest minds,strongest supporters, and best friends. I’m talking about Rick ‘Mad Dog’ Mattix."

"He was integral to this field. He will never be replaced and his contributions can never be measured because they will benefit research for generations to come."

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Four pages including one image.
Five advertisements.